Those Frustrating Migraine Symptoms – Auditory Hallucinations

Migraine is a complex disease with myriad possible symptoms, including auditory hallucinations. Some of these symptoms can be frightening; at the least, they’re frustrating.

The term auditory hallucination is fairly self-explanatory. It means hearing sounds that aren’t really present.

Along with olfactory hallucinations, auditory hallucinations are less common than many other migraine symptoms. Both auditory hallucinations and olfactory hallucinations usually occur during the aura phase of a migraine attack..

Auditory hallucinations can be an especially frustrating symptom when they occur at the same time as phonophobia. There are no symptomatic treatments for auditory hallucinations. They usually subside once the aura phase ends. If not, they subside along with other migraine symptoms, when an abortive medication is used and is effective.

More Frustrating Migraine Symptoms:

Those Frustrating Migraine Symptoms — Allodynia

Those Frustrating Migraine Symptoms — Anxiety

Those Frustrating Migraine Symptoms — Aphasia

Those Frustrating Migraine Symptoms — Hemiplegia

Those Frustrating Migraine Symptoms — Motor Weakness

Those Frustrating Migraine Symptoms — Neck Pain

Those Frustrating Migraine Symptoms — Olfactory Hallucinations

Those Frustrating Migraine Symptoms — Osmophobia

Those Frustrating Migraine Symptoms — Paresthesia

Those Frustrating Migraine Symptoms — Phosphenes

Those Frustrating Migraine Symptoms — Photophobia

Reviewed by David Watson, MD.

© Teri Robert, 2017.


Teri Robert is a leading patient educator and advocate in the area of migraine and other headache disorders, and has been writing for the HealthCentral migraine site since 2007. She is a co-founder of the Alliance for Headache Disorders Advocacy and the American Headache and Migraine Association. She received the National Headache Foundation’s Patient Partners Award for “ongoing patient education, support, and advocacy” in 2004 and a Distinguished Service Award from the American Headache Society in 2013. You can find links to Teri’s work on her web site and blog and follow her on Facebook, Twitter, StumbleUpon, Pinterest, LinkedIn, and Google+.

          

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